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Photography Series - Is It In Focus?

As I had mentioned in my last post, I had a desire to learn my camera. I had also mentioned that I couldn't understand anything that my husband was saying when he first tried teaching me photography. Well, It wasn't until I stopped and realized that this was really going to take some work on my part, that I started to understand what he was saying. Honestly, I had to actually listen and take a ton of pictures to get it right. I had to be focused to get my photos in focus. I am really grateful for how much patience he has had with me.


So, are you using your camera to your advantage? Are you using your camera on the automatic setting? Get your camera off automatic by learning about your camera. Read your manual or get someone who is a scrapbooker or photographer to explain your camera to you. 

Can you believe there really are only three things to learn to start taking better photographs? These three things effect exposure. Exposure is when your photo is not too light or not too dark. (Hey there is a photography word in there!)

1. Light - which is effected by aperture (Ohhhh, there is another photography word!)

2. Shutter Speed - which is how long the camera opens the shutter to allow light to come in

3. ISO - you can adjust how sensitive the camera is to light


Today I want to talk to you about "ISO". This always confused me until I realized that another term for ISO is "film speed." Then, I remembered the days I used film cameras and had to pay attention to what film I bought. There were different film speeds like 200, 400, 600, 800, and 1600. You remember, right?!

So, what film speed (or ISO) did I buy when I was going to be outside at the beach? I bought 200 for bright sunlight! I used 400 for outside with some shade. When I was indoors, I needed 600. 800 when it was dark or for action shots.

Do you remember what happened to your photos if you tried to use 200 speed film indoors? They were always dark! When I used 800 speed film outside in bright sunlight my pictures were always "grainy" and not "crisp".


When I could remember the film speeds from my film days, it helped me understand the ISO setting on my camera. This is one of the two settings that you need to really know on your camera. Try to find the ISO setting on your camera. Test it out. Try photographing a few still life photos. Get to know your ISO settings and start to familiarize yourself with what each "film speed" does.


Create Well: I had to be focused to get my photos in focus.

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